GREENSBORO – The NCAA released its single-year and multiyear annual Academic Progress Rate report for each Division I athletics program on Tuesday, including North Carolina A&T State University.

A program’s APR score measures how successful the sport and the institution are at graduating its student-athletes. A good score is 930, a perfect score is 1000. The A&T football APR single-year score continued its positive trend in 2011-12 as the Aggies posted a single-year score of 944. This score brings A&T’s multiyear score to 874, and takes the Aggies football program out of the NCAA’s sanction status.  Over the past few years Aggies football has seen its scholarships reduced and its countable practice hours limited, including elimination of spring practice in 2013, due to low APR scores.

“We are certainly encouraged but not satisfied with today’s APR data released by the NCAA”, said A&T Athletics Director Earl Hilton. “We are elated to see the football team come out of the penalty phase.  We are delighted that all of our teams are eligible for postseason competition next year. I appreciate the hard work of our student-athletes, their coaches, our academic support team, and scores of faculty members and administrators who have brought us to this place.  We still have work to do, and we will continue to marshal the necessary institutional resources to support academic and competitive excellence among our students.”

The Aggies highest multiyear score was a 973, recorded by the women’s tennis team. Two Aggie programs recorded a perfect single-year score in 2011-12 – women’s tennis and women’s cross country.

Men’s basketball did dip in 2011-12 from the previous two single year scores, but the program has seven seniors who are on pace to graduate from the university in Fall 2013. Two programs will impose NCAA sanctions for low multi-year APR scores. Men’s Indoor and Outdoor Track and Field will be limited to five days and 16 hours of countable activity per week during 2013-14 as opposed to 20 hours per week.

“We’re talking about two programs that have had four head coaches in three years,” said Hilton. “After subpar 2009-10 single-year scores, we see positive trends from both programs. Each of the last two years their scores have trended upward, and we don’t foresee this being a long-term problem for either squad.”